Quantcast

Thursday, April 9, 2020

Stuck Inside Recommendations 11-20

On Facebook I started recommending a book a day for those stuck inside and looking for something good to read. I'm alternating between books published by Macmillan (my employer) and not. (Simply, because the vast majority of my reading is Macmillan books, it's really hard for me to not have this unbalance in any list I put together.) And I thought I'd pull together those recommendations every 10 days here, for people who I'm not Facebook friends with.

Please buy books from independent bookstores! You can find your nearby indies here, or you can buy from bookshop.org or you can get audiobooks from Libro.fm. Those last two you either can get to through the website of an indie, and have part of your purchase go to that indie directly, or if you really don't know of one, any purchases made on those sites, even unaffiliated ones, will indirectly support independent bookstores. Bookstores are really struggling right now, from chains on down to the little guys, and right now, you have a lot of time to read! Seems like two great things that go great together.

Now, on with the list! While these are numbered, they are not ranked. I've starred the non-Macmillan books, and if I reviewed them, I'll link to the review. Every one of these books got a 5-star rating from me!

11. The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde*

12. Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel 

13. Major Pettigrew's Last Stand by Helen Simonson*

14. Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan

15. Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience and Redemption by Laura Hillenbrand*

16. Uncommon Carriers by John McPhee

17. The Sound of a Wild Snail Eating by Elisabeth Tova Bailey*

18. Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson 

19. The Unit by Ninni Holmqvist, translated by Marlaine Delargy*

20. My Ex-Life by Stephen McCauley

  

  

 

Tuesday, April 7, 2020

Book Review: The Address Book: The Untold History of the Places Where We Live by Deirdre Mask

What does your street address say about you? For most of my adult life, especially with apartments, I've felt like I've had needlessly complicated addresses. My name is long and trying to also fit the address in the return-address part of an envelope has sometimes been very frustrating. It can also be difficult to get other people to understand and spell your address. When I first moved to Montclair, I lived on Claremont Ave. It's like Montclair--but the two parts of the word are reversed. And "Clair/Clare" is spelled differently. The address seemed simple at first but it was less fun as time went on. When I lived in NYC, Manhattanites found Queens confusing when I didn't think it was at all. Take the grid system and turn it 90 degrees. Then the first few digits before the hyphen are the closest cross street. So if I lived at 19-40 45th Street. I was on the block between 19th and 20th Ave. That made so much sense to me!

Having learned my way around 3 new cities as an adult, and now working in a dozen more as a field rep, I appreciate regular systems so much. But there are exceptions to every rule. In Queens, those exceptions mean that in addition to Streets and Avenues, there are Roads and Crescents. They also follow rules, but sometimes there are exceptions that have to be made. In my hometown of Nashville, when I worked at Vanderbilt, I usually would park on Lyle Street. Which doesn't seem strange at all except that it came after 25th Street. It went 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 24th, 25th, Lyle. Huh? Later when I worked at a B&N, we would constantly get phone calls from lost customers looking for the store. We always knew what the problem was. They were on Harding Lane. We were on Harding Road. Across town.

So who named all these streets? And do you think naming streets is probably pretty simple? (If so, you've never driven in Boston, shudder.) Would you be surprised to learn there are streets today, in America (mostly in West Virginia apparently), that aren't named at all? What happens when two towns merge and there are already two Beacon Streets? (If you're Boston, you keep them both and confound any outsiders! Most other towns try to come up with a better solution.)

Have you heard Chris Rock's joke about Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.? It's pretty funny. But when you think about it. it's also really sad. I love that in Chapel Hill, NC, MLK Blvd. isn't a bad street in a bad part of town. Heck, it's where the independent bookstore is, and nothing says fully gentrified like that! But Ms. Mask looks at efforts in St. Louis to improve the business district on MLK Blvd. and the stumbling blocks that keep arising.

Did you ever think that grid systems didn't just happen? And that they're a very American invention? And yet we hired a Frenchman to design Washington DC, where we have a combination of a grid system with wide boulevards and roundabouts. How did the advent of addresses relate to the cholera epidemic? And the Hapsburgs? How does Amazon find you if you don't have an address? Can giving everyone addresses help stop the epidemic of homelessness? If you have ever wondered about any of these things, wonder no more! This is the book of fascinating facts and micro history for you!

This book is published by St. Martin's Press, a division of Macmillan, my employer.

Saturday, April 4, 2020

Book Review: It Sounded Better in My Head by Nina Kenwood


Her senior year, Natalie's parents announce they're getting a divorce. But what really knocks her back is that they're been separated--but living under the same roof and Natalie didn't suspect a thing--for ten months. No fights, no yelling, nothing. Natalie is incredulous and also wondering why they're divorcing if everything is so amiable. Recently her two best friends, Zach and Lucy have starting dating, leaving her feeling a bit like the odd man out in their threesome. So when Zach's older brother's friend invites her to go to a party, she says yes.

It's horribly uncomfortable. She hates parties. Everyone's a lot older. She can't find Owen or Alex and locks herself in the bathroom for twenty minutes. While eventually she comes out and the boys arrive, she quickly figures out that Owen is a dolt, despite being incredibly cute. But Alex, Zach's brother, keeps an eye on her at the party, and she starts to wonder if there's something there.

But she just can't believe it. Why would any cute guy be interested in her? Natalie's self-esteem was destroyed in her early teens when cystic acne destroyed her face and her back and her opinion of herself. After years of doctor's appointments and creams and ointments and pills, it's finally, barely under control. But the scars are permanent. And most of them are not on her skin, but in her soul. I did find this to be an interesting condition which I know affects a lot of people. My husband has some acne scarring, and two of my three siblings had acne bad enough that it required powerful medication to resolve. I'm sure tons and tons of teens will appreciate having a protagonist who goes through this and has come out the other side--but with life-long side effects.

The book doesn't follow a lot of the traditional teen romance tropes, but it was incredibly enjoyable. Not despite that, but largely because of that. Natalie is used to being the funny one, but her role has changed within her friend group and her family, and she's not sure who she is anymore, or how to act. The uncertainty makes her sharper than usual and she can be antagonistic and push people away. She has to learn how to be herself again, and who that is. And how to be a good friend, a good daughter and--dare I say it? A good girlfriend even.

This review is a part of Kid Konnection, hosted by Booking Mama, a collection of children's book-related posts over the weekend.

This book is published by Flatiron Books, a division of Macmillan, my employer.

Wednesday, April 1, 2020

My Month in Review: March

The Month in Review meme is hosted by Nicole at Feed Your Fiction Addiction.

I note the non-Macmillan books in this post with a star.

Books completed this month:
One Wild Bird at a Time: Portraits of Individual Lives by Bernd Heinrich (audiobook)*
Never Caught by Erica Armstrong Dunbar, narrated by Robin Miles (audiobook)*
To Hold Up the Sky by Cixin Liu
Dancing with the Octopus: A Memoir of a Crime by Debora Harding
Imperfect Union: How Jessie and John Frémont Mapped the West, Invented Celebrity, and Helped Cause the Civil War by Steve Inskeep
Good Morning, Monster: Five Heroic Journeys to Emotional Recovery by Catherine Gildiner
The Other Mother by Matthew Dicks

Books I am currently reading/listening to:
Check, Please!, Book 2: Sticks and Scones by Ngozi Ukazu

What I acquired this month (non-work books):

Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Book Review: Miss Austen by Gill Hornby

Late in life, twenty-five years after her sister Jane Austen died, Cassandra Austen systematically destroyed (or edited by cutting out parts) many of her letters. Jane Austen had not yet achieved the literary status she holds today, but she was well on her way, and Cassandra had hopes. It's a tragedy for literary historians, but a boon for other novelists. In this book, Gill Hornby (yes, wife of Nick Hornby) imagines Cassandra going to visit a relative in hopes of recovering some of Jane's more open and honest correspondence--and getting rid of it.

Cassandra has outlived her parents (her mother lived to 87 though!), her sister, a few brothers, and while she's always, always made an effort to be exceptionally helpful, as she knew an unmarried female relative was a burden, she's also mostly outlived her helpfulness. But when her brother dies and his daughter has to pack up and move out of the vicarage, she uses her reputation for helpfulness as an excuse for a visit in order to hunt for more of Jane's letters. Throughout the book, we get flashes back to Cassandra's own engagement which ended in tragedy, to missed romances for both Jane and Cassandra later, to Jane and Cassandra's life together, and to Jane's final days. As Cassandra reflects on her (and Jane's) life choices and the results, she consistently declares herself to be incredibly happy with how things turned out and that she wouldn't have it any other way. And yet, when she sees her niece, a fellow spinster who is about to be homeless, Cassandra can't help but try to help. Is it possible she does regret some opportunities not taken? She'll never admit it to herself, but we readers can perhaps see alternate paths that would have also lead to happiness.

This novel is contemplative, quiet, about looking back on a life well-lived, but not the traditional path taken. There are hints here and there of where bits of their own lives were appropriated by Jane, or perhaps inspired certain scenes or language. Had Cassandra married, would we not have Jane's novels? Or would they have been different? Ms. Hornby really gets into the mind of a nineteenth-century woman, who doesn't even consider most options a single woman would these days, and it's just fascinating how burdensome and guilty they felt about what was only partly a choice and partly circumstance. There is a distinct feeling of failure throughout, despite achievements and happiness. As if shepherding six spectacular novels that will one day enter the canon of English Literature, to fruition, were naturally a much lesser accomplishment than marriage and children. The assumptions of gender roles are both expected and sad.

That said, the book isn't sad. Jane is a feisty and sharp observer, and Cassandra as our narrator, softens her a bit, at least with us. It's interesting to see their parents as lighter, less extreme versions of the elder Bennets, and to finally notice that Emma and Mansfield Park are opposites of each other based on a single line of dialogue (one book is about a girl who is rich in material good but poor in values, and then the reverse. How did this never occur to me before?) It was hilarious to hear James Austen's wretched poetry (which is all real, direct quotes of Jane's brother's dreadful attempts, which were lauded at the time.) And to wonder at Jane Austen's life turning out rather like how we imagine Mary Bennet's future, of all people. Was Austen to cruel to Mary because she didn't want to acknowledge their similar circumstances?

This book will make you think a lot about Austen, her works, and the actual human everyday life of writers outside of their books. Ms. Hornby seems to have done extensive research which all rang true (Ms. Hornby actually lives in one of the houses where the Austens once lived!) A must-read for any Austen fan.

This book is being published by Flatiron Books, a division of Macmillan, my employer.

Sunday, March 29, 2020

4 History Audiobooks

I love listening to history books on audio. For me, fiction on audio has issues. Nonfiction is my preferred audiobook, and after memoir, history is just great. You might be familiar with the broad strokes, if you miss a line or two due to traffic situations, it won't affect the overall story, and it's usually pretty interesting.

I've gotten way behind on my reviews, so I thought I'd combine four history audiobooks into one post. By the way, if you're stuck inside and listening to some audiobooks sounds like a good idea, I get most of mine through my local library on the Libby app, and the rest through Libro.fm. On Libro.fm you can pick an independent bookstore and help support them through your audio purchases. Most libraries only have new releases and you might have to wait weeks or months for the hot ones. On Libro, their depth of backlist is greater, and you own it, so you get it right now, and you don't have to listen to it in two weeks or it disappears--ideal for longer ones. Now, on to the reviews!

A History of the World in 6 Glasses by Tom Standage
It's good to start with an overview! This history goes back to the very beginnings of civilization, with beer. Water has rarely been potable once humans stopped being nomadic and settled down. Plus humans (and some other animals too!) have always had interest in intoxicants. After we got beer mastered, next up was wine. Following that, naturally spirits. Then we've got all of alcohol down pat, so on to coffee, tea, and finally cola. This book covers thousands of years of history, and I learned some really interesting tidbits, like how Pepsi was able to sell behind the iron curtain, therefore when the Eastern Bloc countries were finally opened to the west, Coke took over a symbolic of the west, even though Pepsi had long been available in Moscow.

Never Caught: The Washingtons' Relentless Pursuit of Their Runaway Slave, Ona Judge by Erica Armstrong Dunbar
While George and Martha Washington lived in Philadelphia, the second capitol of the United States, Pennsylvania had a law on the books that after 6 months, any enslaved person could petition for (and be granted) their freedom. Luckily for them, this was pointed out to them just before they were there six months, along with a loophole. If they took their enslaved people back to Virginia every five and a half months, the clock would restart every time. Well, if you think that was good enough for those enslaved people, who had worked alongside free whites and some free blacks in both New York City and Philadelphia, you'd be sorely mistaken. And one in particular, Ona Judge, Martha's personal slave, had had enough, and ran away. And man, the Washingtons really tried to get her back.


Imperfect Union: How Jessie and John Frémont Mapped the West, Invented Celebrity, and Helped Cause the Civil War by Steve Inskeep
Ah, how comforting it is to hear Steve Inskeep in your ear, talking just to you for hours on end. And about a truly interesting and largely forgotten character from the early days of the United States. Yes, I know you've heard of John Fremont, but can you tell me why? I sure couldn't. Turns out he was an explorer of the West, helped found California (and was one of its very first senators, just for a matter of months), fought Mexicans (sometimes illegally), was court-marshaled, and went on to run for president (not necessarily in that order). Along the way he married Jessie Benton, daughter of a longtime Senator, who turned out to be the famous woman behind a great man. John wouldn't have accomplished half of what he did, if it wasn't for Jessie's support, and more importantly her behind the scenes power, her understanding of political machinations and manipulations, and her ability to play the new media in a way never done before, making them the first real "celebrities" in the modern sense of the word.

You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington by Alexis Coe
Most biographies of George Washington are written by men (and by most, I mean 99.9%) and they're mostly not very critical, rather fawning looks. Even the ones written by respected Big Guys in biographies, don't tend to question what they read in previous biographies about how Washington's mother was horrible (um, take context into consideration please, and also go back to original sources) and they also are overly concerned about Washington's lack of progeny and hence, his manliness (which never seemed to bother Washington.) So this is a refreshing look at him as a three-dimensional human. Ms. Coe isn't out to tear him down from his pedestal, but rather to make him not  a marble statue at all, but instead, a human being. It's fascinating and a fresh look and I listened to the whole thing in one day! (Yes, it did cover a little of the same ground as Never Caught. But not in a way that felt overly redundant. That incident here is just given a few paragraphs in the last section of the book. You should definitely read both.)

All four of these I borrowed from my local library via Libby. 

Saturday, March 28, 2020

Stuck Inside Recommendations 1-10

On Facebook I started recommending a book a day for those stuck inside and looking for something good to read. I'm alternating between books published by Macmillan (my employer) and not. (Simply, because the vast majority of my reading is Macmillan books, it's really hard for me to not have this unbalance in any list I put together.) And I thought I'd pull together those recommendations every 10 days here, for people who I'm not Facebook friends with.

Please buy books from independent bookstores! You can find your nearby indies here, or you can buy from bookshop.org or you can get audiobooks from Libro.fm. Those last two you either can get to through the website of an indie, and have part of your purchase go to that indie directly, or if you really don't know of one, any purchases made on those sites, even unaffiliated ones, will indirectly support independent bookstores. Bookstores are really struggling right now, from chains on down to the little guys, and right now, you have a lot of time to read! Seems like two great things that go great together.

Now, on with the list! While these are numbered, they are not ranked. I've starred the non-Macmillan books, and if I reviewed them, I'll link to the review. Every one of these books got a 5-star rating from me!

10. Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk by Kathleen Rooney

9. The Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit by Michael Finkel*

8. Red, White & Royal Blue by Casey McQuiston

7. Tender at the Bone: Growing Up at the Table by Ruth Reichl* (sorry, I read this book before Goodreads existed and before my blog, so no review!)

6. A Good Neighborhood by Therese Anne Fowler

5. A Shot in the Dark (Constable Twitten #1) by Lynne Truss

4. The Story of the Great British Bake Off by Anita Singh*

3. The Calculating Stars (Lady Astronaut #1) by Mary Robinette Kowal

2. Life With Jeeves (Jeeves #2, 4, 6) by P.G. Wodehouse*

1. Twenty-one Truths About Love by Matthew Dicks