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Friday, May 31, 2013

Book Beginnings: My Life as Laura

Book Beginnings on Friday is a meme hosted by Gilion at Rose City Reader. Anyone can participate; just share the opening sentence of your current read, making sure that you include the title and author so others know what you're reading.

My Life as Laura: How I Searched for Laura Ingalls Wilder and Found Myself by Kelly Kathleen Ferguson

"I admit that the origin of the dress mandate was fuzzy at best."

I would love, love, love to visit every Laura Ingalls Wilder location, but in a prairie-style dress? With a hot pink flounce? Hm, maybe not.

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

“Waiting On” Wednesday: Double Double

“Waiting On” Wednesday is a weekly event, hosted here, that spotlights upcoming releases that we're eagerly anticipating. This week's pre-publication “can't-wait-to-read” selection is:

Double Double: A Dual Memoir of Alcoholism by Martha Grimes and Ken Grimes

Goodreads synopsis:
To the final page of this dual memoir, Martha and Ken Grimes keep the reader entertained and informed.

Double Double is a unique and honest, dual memoir of alcoholism, a disease that affects nearly 45 million Americans each year. People who suffer from alcoholism as well as their families and friends know that while it is possible to get sober—there is no one “right” way to do this. Now, award-winning mystery writer Martha Grimes and her son, Ken Grimes, offer two points of view on their struggles with alcoholism. In alternating chapters, they share their stories—stories of drinking, recovery, relapse, friendship, travel, work, success and failure.

Double Double is an intensely personal, candid and illuminating book, filled with insights, humor, a little self-deprecation, and a lot of self-evaluation.

Publishing June 4, 2013 by Scribner.

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Book Review: The Flatiron: The New York Landmark and the Incomparable City That Arose with It by Alice Sparberg Alexiou

I used to work in the Flatiron Building. On the 17th floor (so count three down from the top), on the Broadway side, which in this picture is on your left, about three windows back from the point. See, that's my old desk! Naturally, this book was published by my old publisher, which is housed in the Flatiron.

The trend towards skyscrapers began in Chicago after the Great Fire. It eventually moved to New York after some building codes were updated. It never moved to Europe. Because so many businesses could be in such a small area, back in this day before phones when most business was done in person, a journalist noted that in the course of a day you could make three appointments in one day in London, about eight in New York, and fifteen in Chicago. It was so much more efficient in terms of doing work, as well as getting a lot more rent out of a property for its owners. And this weird little triangle of New York was destined to be a skyscraper, as that was the only use of it that made any sense given the property value.

This book did excel in random facts, particularly in the beginning, but for the first time, I stopped enjoying them. After a while, they started to feel like filler, as the author attempted to turn what really should have been a very long magazine article into a full-length book. Ancillary characters were turned into major ones. Minor incidents were made major. Building trends in Europe were discussed. Building trends for decades prior were also analyzed. While I did enjoy the main story quite a bit, it was pretty thin, and all the filler around it wasn't sufficient to make it into a great history. Mr. Fuller was interesting, as was his son-in-law Harry Black who completed the building and made Fuller's company into a building colossus  It was well-written and not dry or boring, but it ranged far and wide and if you're looking for a book with more focus, this isn't it. I was also personally disappointed that the author rocketed through the last fifty years of the building's history in a few pages. It was interesting that one reason it is still around today is because it was the subject of a lawsuit and because the convoluted contract said that all three owners had to agree to do anything (not just majority rules).

It is an interesting book for an architecture buff or serious NYC historian, but for an average reader, an article would have been better.

I bought this book at my local independent bookstore.

Teaser Tuesdays: The Flatiron

Teaser Tuesdays is hosted by Should Be Reading.

Grab your current read. Open to a random page. Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page. BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!) Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

The Flatiron: The New York Landmark and the Incomparable City That Arose with It by Alice Sparberg Alexiou p. 13

"An unknown person one day hit upon the idea to describe them as 'sky scrapers,' a nautical term that signified the uppermost flag of a ship's mast. Some time in the 1880s, the words 'sky scraper' began to appear in print to denote these buildings."

I think it's pretty neat that the word "skyscraper" was originally a nautical term. When these buildings first started going up, a lot of the construction workers on the jobs were in fact former sailors, as they were the only people comfortable going up to these terrifying heights (of 10-16 stories!)

Monday, May 27, 2013

It's Monday! What Are You Reading?

This meme is now hosted by Sheila at Book Journey.

Books completed last week:
Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks

Books I am currently reading/listening to:
The Honest Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone--Especially Ourselves by Dan Ariely (audio)
Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal by Mary Roach (audio)

Up next:
Life Itself by Roger Ebert
The Conditions of Love by Dale M. Kushner
Jeneration X: One Reluctant Adult's Attempt to Unarrest Her Arrested Development; Or, Why It's Never Too Late for Her Dumb Ass to Learn Why Froot Loops Are Not for Dinner by Jen Lancaster

Friday, May 24, 2013

Book Beginnings: The Flatiron

Book Beginnings on Friday is a meme hosted by Gilion at Rose City Reader. Anyone can participate; just share the opening sentence of your current read, making sure that you include the title and author so others know what you're reading.

The Flatiron: The New York Landmark and the Incomparable City That Arose with It by Alice Sparberg Alexiou

"Once upon a time, the Flatiron Building was a member of my family."

As cool as the Flatiron Building is (I used to work in it), I admit I wondered who would actually devote the time to write an entire book about it, but the author's grandfather owned it for about fifty years, which makes perfect sense.

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

“Waiting On” Wednesday: The Tao of Martha


“Waiting On” Wednesday is a weekly event, hosted here, that spotlights upcoming releases that we're eagerly anticipating. This week's pre-publication “can't-wait-to-read” selection is:

The Tao of Martha: My Year of LIVING; Or, Why I'm Never Getting All That Glitter Off of the Dog by Jen Lancaster

Goodreads synopsis:
One would think that with Jen Lancaster’s impressive list of bestselling self-improvement memoirs—Bitter Is the New Black; Bright Lights, Big Ass; Such a Pretty Fat; Pretty in Plaid; My Fair Lazy; and Jeneration X—that she would have it all together by now.

One would be wrong.

Jen’s still a little rough around the edges. Suffice it to say, she’s no Martha Stewart. And that is exactly why Jen is going to Martha up and live her life according to the advice of America’s overachieving older sister—the woman who turns lemons into lavender-infused lemonade.

By immersing herself in Martha’s media empire, Jen will embark on a yearlong quest to take herself, her house, her husband (and maybe even her pets) to the next level—from closet organization to craft making, from party planning to kitchen prep.

Maybe Jen can go four days without giving herself food poisoning if she follows Martha’s dictates on proper storage....Maybe she can grow closer to her girlfriends by taking up their boring-ass hobbies like knitting and sewing.…Maybe she can finally rid her workout clothes of meatball stains by using Martha’s laundry tips.… Maybe she can create a more meaningful anniversary celebration than just getting drunk in the pool with her husband....again. And maybe, just maybe, she’ll discover that the key to happiness does, in fact, lie in Martha’s perfectly arranged cupboards and artfully displayed charcuterie platters.

Or maybe not.

Publishing June 4, 2013 by NAL Hardcover.

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Teaser Tuesdays: Dwarf

Teaser Tuesdays is hosted by Should Be Reading.

Grab your current read. Open to a random page. Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page. BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!) Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Dwarf: A Memoir of How One Woman Fought for a Body-and a Life-She Was Never Supposed to Have by Tiffanie DiDonato p. 39

"Moments before we pulled into the Children's parking lot, Mom explained to me again, in the simplest manner, that this surgery was part of a bigger picture. The bone-lengthening operation was part of my ongoing fight to do things on my own, she said."

This would be really tough. Both to decide to have your child go through not just a surgery but one that will have a very painful several months following, when she herself isn't old enough to understand what's really going on, but also because you have to make this decision for your child, at least for the first surgery, as they need to do it when the child is still young, therefore the child isn't old enough to make the decision herself. What if Tiffanie, when she got older, disagreed with her mother on the bone-lengthening surgery? What if the surgery didn't go well? This couldn't have been easy.

Book Review: Dwarf: A Memoir of How One Woman Fought for a Body-and a Life-She Was Never Supposed to Have by Tiffanie DiDonato with Rennie Dyball

I do adore memoirs, and as an avid watcher of "Little People, Big World" and "The Little Couple," this was a perfect diversion.

Tiffanie has a rare form of dwarfism, and doesn't realize it herself for many years, until she's in school, because her parents never bring it up. She doesn't realize all the doctor's appointments, surgeries, and the tricks she has to do around the house for things like getting a cereal bowl and turning on light switches, are unusual until after she ends up stuck in the girls' bathroom at school with a doorknob too high and a door too heavy for her to navigate. Tiffanie's mother finds out about the new and controversial bone-lengthening operations and decides the improved quality of life is worth the pain and suffering, and so Tiffanie undergoes the surgery and spends months being tutored at home while periodically turning a screw that slowly but surely adds two inches to her lower legs, upper legs, and arms. As a teenager, she decides herself that she wants to do the surgeries a second time, but only if she can find a doctor who's willing to try for more than two inches at each of the sites.

Meanwhile, her parents divorce and get back together, she grows up, goes to school, gets a job at her grandfather's retirement home, and starts to correspond with a cute soldier overseas. The main point all the TV shows and books and speeches about Little People tries to convey is how ordinary their lives are, but that belies the very important fact that they just aren't. They're ordinary in the details, but in the aggregate, they're normal for someone with a medium-scale handicap, and that's just a fact. I appreciated very much that Tiffanie didn't shy away from this at all. As she describes going through excruciating pain in the effort to live a more normal life, she doesn't deny that it's not normal that as a child she couldn't reach her own ears or see over a countertop, and even as a teen she struggled with things like reaching the pedals of a car. Her father is refreshing in that he isn't one of those super-supportive "you can do anything!" parents; instead he is afraid, anxious, disagrees with the surgeries, and wants to follow Tiffanie around everywhere helping her out as much as possible so she won't have to do much. In college she found out that the nice person always shoveling her car out of the snow after a snowstorm was not the local custodian as she had suspected, but her Dad who drove a long way in the middle of the night to do it every single time.

The book ends with her falling in love and having a storybook wedding, but we kind of get away from the main topic in the first 7/8 of the book and we don't hear much about her now husband's reaction to her dwarfism after their first meeting, don't hear if it's going to cause problems in her pregnancy (other than raising the risk of her child having dwarfism), and if she finds today, after all her surgeries, that there are still things she can't do at 4'10". Instead, the book does become rather ordinary. Although of course it's terribly nice that Tiffanie meets a cute guy who sees beyond her issues and loves her for who she truly is and they live happily ever after.

The book was a quick read, very diverting, and I admire Tiffanie for meeting challenges head-on and doing what works best for her, no matter others' opinions.

I bought this book at my local independent bookstore.

Monday, May 20, 2013

It's Monday! What Are You Reading?

This meme is now hosted by Sheila at Book Journey.

Books completed last week:
Titanic Thompson: The Man Who Bet on Everything by Kevin Cook
The Brass Verdict by Michael Connelly

Books I am currently reading/listening to:
Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks
Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal by Mary Roach
The Honest Truth About Dishonesty: How We Lie to Everyone--Especially Ourselves by Dan Ariely

Up next:
The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey
Tigers in Red Weather by Liza Klaussmann
The Richest Woman in America: The Life and Times of Hetty Green by Janet Wallach

Friday, May 17, 2013

Book Beginnings: Dwarf

Book Beginnings on Friday is a meme hosted by Gilion at Rose City Reader. Anyone can participate; just share the opening sentence of your current read, making sure that you include the title and author so others know what you're reading.

Dwarf: A Memoir of How One Woman Fought for a Body-and a Life-She Was Never Supposed to Have by Tiffanie DiDonato

"Believe it or not, I actually enjoyed watching Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs as a child."

It never would have occurred to me, but I'll bet little people do get asked that question a lot.


Wednesday, May 15, 2013

“Waiting On” Wednesday: The Last Summer of the Camperdowns

“Waiting On” Wednesday is a weekly event, hosted here, that spotlights upcoming releases that we're eagerly anticipating. This week's pre-publication “can't-wait-to-read” selection is:

The Last Summer of the Camperdowns by Elizabeth Kelly

Synopsis from Goodreads:
Set on Cape Cod during one tumultuous summer, Elizabeth Kelly’s gothic family story will delight readers of The Family Fang and The Giant’s House.

The Last Summer of the Camperdowns, from the best-selling author of Apologize, Apologize!, introduces Riddle James Camperdown, the twelve-year-old daughter of the idealistic Camp and his manicured, razor-sharp wife, Greer. It's 1972, and Riddle's father is running for office from the family compound in Wellfleet, Massachusetts. Between Camp's desire to toughen her up and Greer's demand for glamour, Riddle has her hands full juggling her eccentric parents. When she accidentally witnesses a crime close to home, her confusion and fear keep her silent. As the summer unfolds, the consequences of her silence multiply. Another mysterious and powerful family, the Devlins, slowly emerges as the keepers of astonishing secrets that could shatter the Camperdowns. As an old love triangle, bitter war wounds, and the struggle for status spiral out of control, Riddle can only watch, hoping for the courage to reveal the truth. The Last Summer of the Camperdowns is poised to become the summer's uproarious and dramatic must-read.

Publishing June 3, 2013 by Liveright.

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Book Review: Life After Life by Jill McCorkle

Jill McCorkle was the very first Southern author I was introduced to, back in college (although not in a class, I read her books for fun outside of class.) She's always been one of my very favorite authors.

The Pine Haven retirement center in North Carolina is home to Stanley, a former lawyer now obsessed with professional wrestling; Rachel, a former lawyer from Boston who has moved here to be near the grave of her lover; Toby, a former teacher; Madge, the wife of a respected judge; Sadie who makes photo collages putting the other residents in places they've never been. Also there is Joanna who works with hospice, C.J. who does hair and nails, and Abby, the little girl next door who feels more love from Sadie and the other residents than she ever has from her bitterly fighting parents.

While I did like this book, I think if it had been structured differently, it could have been better. There were what seemed like a dozen narrators, and initially while they do all know each other, it's unclear how or if the plot threads will marry up. Normally I am not a fan of short story collections, but I think this actually could have been more effective as a collections of interconnected stories, like Olive Kitteredge. Instead, since it is framed as a traditional novel, the characters and plot threads not fully resolved seem to stand out more to me. That said, it's still excellent. Jill McCorkle is a real master of dialogue and language. The characters are all fully developed and believable, unique and real. I especially liked Rachel and Joanna. I understand the ending is a shocker to a lot of people, and while I admit I didn't exactly see it coming, it didn't bother me. I love Ms. McCorkle's writing so much, and Life After Life is a wonderful story, featuring a segment of the population normally ignored, and showing us their pasts, their secrets, their desires, and their futures.

I got this book free after an event where the publisher's publicist left a few free Algonquin books.

Teaser Tuesdays: Life After Life by Jill McCorkle

Teaser Tuesdays is hosted by Should Be Reading.

Grab your current read. Open to a random page. Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page. BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!) Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

Life After Life by Jill McCorkle p. 23

"The simple rule: some get saved, but most don't. The choices are important before the years begin to go so very fast."

I actually think this is a quote worth hanging on to. It's pretty profound.

Monday, May 13, 2013

It's Monday! What Are You Reading?

This meme is now hosted by Sheila at Book Journey.

Books completed last week:
Confessions of a Prairie Bitch by Alison Arngrim

Books I am currently reading/listening to:
The Honest Truth About Dishonesty by Dan Ariely
Up next:
The Dovekeepers by Alice Hoffman
Spencerville by Nelson DeMille
Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal by Mary Roach

Friday, May 10, 2013

Book Beginnings: Life After Life

Book Beginnings on Friday is a meme hosted by Gilion at Rose City Reader. Anyone can participate; just share the opening sentence of your current read, making sure that you include the title and author so others know what you're reading.

Life After Life by Jill McCorkle

"Now Joanna is holding the hand of someone waiting for her daughter to arrive."

Joanna is a hospice worker who helps people who are just about to die. At a retirement home, she is in demand a lot.

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

“Waiting On” Wednesday: The Feud: The Hatfields and McCoys

“Waiting On” Wednesday is a weekly event, hosted here, that spotlights upcoming releases that we're eagerly anticipating. This week's pre-publication “can't-wait-to-read” selection is:

The Feud: The Hatfields and McCoys by Dean King

Synopsis from Goodreads:
For more than a century, the enduring feud between the Hatfields and the McCoys has been American shorthand for passionate, unyielding, and even violent confrontation. Yet despite numerous articles, books, television shows, and feature films, nobody has ever told the in-depth true story of this legendarily fierce-and far-reaching-clash in the heart of Appalachia. Drawing upon years of original research, including the discovery of previously lost and ignored documents and interviews with relatives of both families, bestselling author Dean King finally gives us the full, unvarnished tale, one vastly more enthralling than the myth.

Unlike previous accounts, King's begins in the mid-nineteenth century, when the Hatfields and McCoys lived side-by-side in relative harmony. Theirs was a hardscrabble life of farming and hunting, timbering and moonshining-and raising large and boisterous families-in the rugged hollows and hills of Virginia and Kentucky. Cut off from much of the outside world, these descendants of Scots-Irish and English pioneers spoke a language many Americans would find hard to understand. Yet contrary to popular belief, the Hatfields and McCoys were established and influential landowners who had intermarried and worked together for decades.

When the Civil War came, and the outside world crashed into their lives, family members were forced to choose sides. After the war, the lines that had been drawn remained-and the violence not only lived on but became personal. By the time the fury finally subsided, a dozen family members would be in the grave. The hostilities grew to be a national spectacle, and the cycle of killing, kidnapping, stalking by bounty hunters, and skirmishing between governors spawned a legal battle that went all the way to the United States Supreme Court and still influences us today.

Filled with bitter quarrels, reckless affairs, treacherous betrayals, relentless mercenaries, and courageous detectives, The Fued is the riveting story of two frontier families struggling for survival within the narrow confines of an unforgiving land. It is a formative American tale, and in it, we see the reflection of our own family bonds and the lengths to which we might go in order to defend our honor, our loyalties, and our livelihood.

Publishing May 14, 2013 by Little, Brown and Company.

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

Book Review: The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien

I first was assigned this book in college, but the class didn't get around to it. I hung onto it for years as the professor had told us it was amazing, but it eventually went away in a purge. Then three years ago, a friend at the publisher asked if I'd like to have a copy as they were doing a special 20th Anniversary Edition, and I said yes. My copy is autographed to me! And luckily I talked my book club into reading it.

While one or two members of the book club didn't love the book, they all said they thought it was worthwhile. Some people were bothered by the war and the death and violence. And while none of those are my favorite things, this is a book about the Vietnam War, and so it is inevitable.

Tim O'Brien went to Vietnam as a 22-year-old, fresh out of college, and probably one of the older boys in his company. Is this book a memoir? A novel? A short story collection? All of the above? It reads like a memoir, but he tells us some things aren't true. But they are true. But they're not true. It's more about the truth of the emotions that's so vital and telling. At the end of this book, you really feel like you understand what it was like for Tim and the other soldiers. Some died horrible deaths, some skated through physically unscathed, some were poets, some were sadists. They all carried talismans that they thought would keep them safe, would keep them connected to home, would keep them same, and even after they came home, they all carried the emotional baggage. Some coped, some did not.

His writing is beautiful. It's poetic. It's stunning. The writing is such perfection that you read through this book fluidly, smoothly, without even seeing how complex the story is. That is the sign of true brilliance. Normally a complex story is difficult to read and slow going, but this was a fast, easy read. The narration changes from third to first to second, some chapters were initially published separately as short stories, some chapter discuss the writing of those stories, some stories are in the present (1990) and one is in the far past of Tim's childhood. And yet it all holds together as a unified whole. I wasn't sure I wanted to read a book about Vietnam, and obviously it took me a really long time to get around to it, but I am so utterly glad that I did. This book is a masterpiece.

I got this book for free from the publisher, but not in expectation of a review.

Teaser Tuesdays: The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien

Teaser Tuesdays is hosted by Should Be Reading.

Grab your current read. Open to a random page. Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page. BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!) Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien p. 31

"On occasions the war was like a Ping-Pong ball. You could put fancy spin on it, you could make it dance."

I was somewhat disbelieving that a book about war could be so beautifully written, but it's almost like poetry.

Monday, May 6, 2013

It's Monday! What Are You Reading?

This meme is now hosted by Sheila at Book Journey.

Books completed last week:
Dwarf: A Memoir of How One Woman Fought for a Body-and a Life-She Was Never Supposed to Have by Tiffanie DiDonato, with Rennie Dyball
The Flatiron: The New York Landmark and the Incomparable City That Arose with It by Alice Sparberg Alexiou

Books I am currently reading/listening to:
Life With Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse
My Life as Laura: How I Searched for Laura Ingalls Wilder and Found Myself by Kelly Kathleen Ferguson

Up next:
The Wisdom of Hair by Kim Boykin
Wash by Margaret Wrinkle
Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal by Mary Roach

Friday, May 3, 2013

Book Beginnings: The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien

Book Beginnings on Friday is a meme hosted by Gilion at Rose City Reader. Anyone can participate; just share the opening sentence of your current read, making sure that you include the title and author so others know what you're reading.

The Things They Carried by Tim O'Brien

"First Lieutenant Jimmy Cross carried letters from a girl named Martha, a junior at Mount Sebastian College in New Jersey."

I the first chapter, the title is taken literally, as the narrator tells us what all the soldiers physically carried. But the also carry emotional baggage and ghosts.

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

“Waiting On” Wednesday: Straight Flush

“Waiting On” Wednesday is a weekly event, hosted here, that spotlights upcoming releases that we're eagerly anticipating. This week's pre-publication “can't-wait-to-read” selection is:

Straight Flush: The True Story of Six College Friends Who Dealt Their Way to a Billion-Dollar Online Poker Empire--And How It All Came Crashing Down . . . by Ben Mezrich

Goodreads synopsis:
From the New York Times bestselling author of The Accidental Billionaires and Bringing Down the House--the sources for the films The Social Network and 21--comes the larger-than-life true tale of a group of American college buddies who brilliantly built a billion-dollar online poker colossus based out of the hedonistic paradise of Costa Rica.

One problem: the U.S. Department of Justice was gunning for them. . . .

Based on extensive insider interviews and participation, acclaimed author Ben Mezrich's Straight Flush tells the captivating rags-to-riches tale of a group of University of Montana frat brothers who turned a weekly poker game in the basement of a local dive bar into AbsolutePoker.com, one of the largest online companies in the world, on par with some of the behemoths of the Internet. At its height, Absolute Poker was an online empire earning more than a million dollars a day, following savvy business strategy and even better luck. Its founders set up their operations in the exotic jungle paradise of Costa Rica, embracing an outrageous lifestyle of girls, parties, and money.

Meanwhile, the gray area of U.S. and international law in which the company operated was becoming a lot more risky, and soon the U.S. Department of Justice had placed a bull's-eye on Absolute Poker. Should they fold--or double down and ride their hot hand? Impossible to put down, Straight Flush is an exclusive, never-before-seen look behind the headlines of one of the wildest business stories of the past decade.

Published May 28, 2013 by William Morrow & Company.