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Monday, August 15, 2016

Book Review: The Clancys of Queens: A Memoir by Tara Clancy

I'm very glad I got to hear this author at an event as her distinctive voice rang in my ears throughout my reading of her book. She has a deep, snarling, yet upbeat rasp. She spoke of how she was inspired to write after reading A Tree Grows in Brooklyn and finding out there weren't really any other books about a working class girl growing up in a borough, and that the one there was was so old and fiction. And thank goodness she was inspired! This is a great book.

Admittedly, I am also biased because I lived in Queens for almost five years. Now I lived in a completely different part, but it was still fairly working class (at that time. Astoria has gotten very trendy in recent years.) But I appreciate so much her wanting to freeze in time a much overlooked borough.

Tara was a world-class tomboy, not just good at spots but at running away and punching, but always good-natured. Her parents divorced when she was little and she lived during the week in a small apartment with her mother, surrounded by extended family, every other weekend at her father's, which was basically a shack, way out almost near JFK airport, and other weekends with her mother at her mother's boyfriend's house on Long Island, which was a very fancy estate and she'd be picked up in a limo. Luckily, that didn't faze her, she didn't have pretensions on those weekends and feel like she was slumming it with her father, nor did she resent either parent's situation. She just accepted it and moved on. Eventually her father, a cop, remarried. And her mother's boyfriend lost most of his money. But Tara, in this rough and tumble life, learned to love reading and writing, despite turning into a quintessential bad girl and getting kicked out of school.

Her voice, as I said, was distinctive and I hope that comes through as well for people who are only reading her on the page. She is a bundle of energy and her spitfire passion for her family and her home shines through on every page.

I received this ARC for free at a NAIBA event, provided by the publisher.

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