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Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Book Review: 30 Before 30 by Marina Shifrin

I love a list. If it's a list where I can already cross off a whole bunch of things and feel accomplished for having done nothing more than read a list, all the better! So while it might seem a little unusual for a 43 year old to read a book about 30 things to do before you're 30, I figured this sounds like a list where I can check everything off!

Of course not. That's not how a book like this goes. If it's all boring, everyday stuff that most everyone has done, it's not a book. Yes, I've done a few (donate hair) and I could do others if I felt like it (ride a bike across the Brooklyn Bridge) but a lot fell in the category of I didn't want to do them, but it was fun watching someone else (Become Internet Famous.) That one in particular crossed off two things, because it was her epic viral video in which she quit her job that made her famous, so I give Marina big points for that.

For the past several years, stomping on Millennials has felt like a sport, one that is rather mean-spirited and unfair (I'd guess 70% of the things we Gen-Xers and Baby Boomers claim are Millennials being entitled are simply things everyone--including us Gen-Xers and Boomers who apparently have really terrible memories--did ourselves when we were early 20-somethings not because of our generation, but just because of the lack of real-work experience that age dictates. Don't believe me? Rewatch Reality Bites and Friends and the first three seasons of The Real World and get back to me. I'll wait.) I super-appreciate that while Marina's book is an obvious push-back to that attitude, she never names it. Instead, she's happy to let it die a quiet death. Meanwhile, she will try to be positive and uplifting, without being cloying or peppy or annoying, which is a great attitude to have.

Sure, some of the things she does like move to another country where she doesn't know the language, are things I do not aspire to, but hey, I've done things she probably wouldn't enjoy either, and we each get to pick our own life lists. Overall, it was a series of essays that ended up being a memoir, about a 20-something working hard to figure out this Real World and her place in it and how to make a go at it without falling on her ass. That's what most of us were trying to do at that same age, with varying levels of success, and I think other 20-somethings will really identify with her and find her journey inspiring. I found that it reassured my faith in this younger generation who are finding their way through some rather rough terrain.

This book is published by my employer.

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