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Sunday, July 29, 2018

Reading By Publisher Take 3

So in 2016 I started tracking what publishers I was reading in my year-end stats and last year, while job hunting, I started a project (never finished because of job getting) to purposefully diversify my reading by publisher. Since the job getting, the opposite has happened to me.

I was initially concerned about reading books from just one publisher, based on my unhappy experience reading only Knopf books (while interviewing for a job in case you're tracking variations on this theme). Of course that's reading a single imprint, not one publisher, and I've worked at Macmillan before (at St. Martin's Press, so in a single division) so I knew I did/do like a lot of their books. But still. It feels limiting.

And yet, I've found it to be so much fun! After all, Macmillan (and her distribution lines) publish 3000-4000 books a year. And they're super diverse in subject matter and literary ilk and even age range, since I sell children's books as well as adult. There definitely are publishers where I would struggle, as my interests diverge a lot from their genres, to find books to interest me, and I would feel much more forced into reading, which sucks. Or I might just not read a whole heck of a lot of their books. That's a choice, and I do know a couple of my fellow Macmillan reps make that choice, but to me, that would make my job harder and also I'd get a lot of side-eye in the office, especially from my boss, so that feels like a questionable decision if you can find some books in the mix that you do like. And at the 5th largest US publisher, that shouldn't be hard to do.

And it isn't! So far every season I have not managed to read all the books I wanted to at the beginning of the season. That's a very good thing. Sometimes it's due to those books not being available until too late (I give myself 4 months to read books for each season and then I have to move on to the next season), sometimes I'm distracted by other books, and sometimes I have heard things throughout the season that make me less excited about a book than I initially was. But this has actually, so far, been a good problem to have, at least on this side.

But it does create another problem. What about all of the non-Macmillan books I want to read?

Argh. Well, I now have to aggressively prioritize. Non-work books can absolutely wedge themselves into my reading agenda the minute they come out (see: David Sedaris). And of course, I prioritize my book club books (which is why when one sucks, nowadays that's an even bigger bummer than before.) But in reality, most of my non-work books are audiobooks. And that really skews what I read for a couple of reasons. For one, a small fraction of books are available on audio in the first place. Tons of books that I want to read just aren't made into audiobooks for a variety of reasons. Second, it's what's available. I don't want to listen to an audiobook on CD, because then I can ONLY listen in my car (no longer own a CD player in my house). Downloadable is the way to go. Thanks to my awesome library system, I have 2 ways I can log into 2 systems: Overdrive/Libby and CloudLibrary. But what I can download depends on what books my library has purchased (leased) on audio from that service. We don't actually have access to the entire library of available audiobooks at these services. I did recently sign up for Libro.fm as well (which is not free; it's like Audible, but
for indies.) That opens up a whole new list of options. But the biggest limitation for me is that there are a bunch of books that I don't want to listen to on audio. I know the experience won't be enjoyable, and I might end up disliking a book that I would have liked in print. Fiction, especially of the literary type, fares less well on audio in my brain. I really prefer nonfiction, and the few novels on audio I listen to tend towards thrillers. I either need something I don't have to 100% listen to and occasionally can be distracted from without missing a crucial element (nonfiction) and/or something compelling that sucks me in which will grab my attention and hang on to it like a vacuum (thriller).

So far this year, I've read 69 books. We are just past the halfway point in the year. Of those 69, 22 are non-Macmillan titles, or 31%. 10 of those were in print so 12 on audio (a much more even split than I was expecting) and 3 (all print) were book club selections. This is not including all of the picture books and early reader books that I read for work, which is roughly 40-50/season, which would really skew my numbers pro-Macmillan.)

I suppose I could cut out those 22 books and read exclusively Macmillan, but I'm not going to do that. Not only because of the David Sedarises in the world, but because it helps me keep up with the market more generally, actually makes my bookstores trust my recommendations more when I occasionally suggest another publisher's book, and it makes me feel more free and not oppressed by what I have to read for work. I've long known that as soon as a book is assigned to me, I don't want to read it, EVEN IF I'M THE ONE WHO ASSIGNED IT (for example, if I suggested it for book club).

With more than a year of mostly reading one publisher, this is my conclusion: it's not bad! I can keep this up. Not sure if my numbers will always look like this, but for now, it's do-able. I do wish more (all?) books were available on audio though.

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