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Saturday, August 4, 2018

Book Review: Wish Upon a Sleepover by Suzanne Selfors


Leilani wants to have more friends. She has a best friend, Autumn, but she's out of town visiting her father every other weekend, leaving Leilani to only be able to hang out with her grandmother. There's a group of 6 girls named Hailey (some variation of spelling) in their class who are popular and seem like they're always having fun. One Hailey lives in the building next door to Leilani's in Seattle. Leilani comes up with a great idea: she'll plan a sleepover for the Haileys and Autumn, and it will be awesome and afterwards they'll all be friends. While planning her sleepover (theme: luau!), a few kids annoy her and she makes not only an Invite list but also a Do Not Invite list (admittedly, a not nice thing to do, but she never meant for this to be seen by anyone other than her.) Her grandmother then "accidentally" send her invites to the Do Not Invite list, argh! So she has three kids she doesn't especially like (and Autumn) come over. While she can see the Haileys at their own sleepover in the next building. 

Her grandmother then tells Leilani about a Hawaiian tradition of Sleepover Soup which she starts. Each person must contribute an ingredient that means something to them and is from somewhere important. Then they all drink the soup together under the moon, and good things will happen. If you caught on that this is a variant of the "stone soup" story, congratulations, you are correct!

Naturally, by the end of the evening, the scavenger hunt for ingredients brings the kids together, they reveal personal things about themselves and end up liking each other and forging bonds. (They also have a run-in with the Haileys and the main one is quite bitchy, although another Hailey would like to be invited to their party next time, showing they're not all obnoxious.) And in the end, did her grandmother do much much more than she claimed, for Leilani to gain some new, better friends? A sweet story without being cloying, fun without being frenetic, and with lessons learned but not heavy-handed, this was a thoroughly enjoyable book.

This review is a part of Kid Konnection, hosted by Booking Mama, a collection of children's book-related posts over the weekend.

This book is published by Imprint, a division of Macmillan, my employer.

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