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Saturday, September 1, 2018

Book Review: Sadie by Courtney Summers

I hadn't wanted to read this book. It's being heavily pushed by my company, but it felt gimmicky to me, and I was selling it in easily, so I didn't feel the need. And then I had two different bookstore buyers in the same day tell me how amazing it was so I gave in.

I never was big into thrillers as a teen and I'm still not, although every once in a while they're fun. Basically, this book is inspired by the first season of the podcast Serial, and half of it is a podcast. a young girl has been found dead, and now her older sister has gone missing. A podcast producer hears about the story and goes to Colorado to investigate. Sadie is sure that she knows who killed her little sister, and she's out for revenge. West McCray doesn't know what happened exactly to Mattie or Sadie, but he knows a good story, and he's determined to find out.

My favorite parts of the story were when West took a wrong turn, or believed someone's lie (that Sadie hadn't believed) or made a wrong assumption. He usually got back on track in the end, but I liked how that demonstrates how no matter how meticulously researched and how many people interviewed, a journalist's story is never the whole truth--just an angle of the truth. And sometimes they can get things wrong.

In other circumstances Sadie could have gone far, so that part is a shame. When bad families happen to good people. But it is important to have books set in poor towns in broken families, so kids see themselves in their reading options. Other kids like Sadie, raising her younger sister alone after her drug-addicted mother disappears, need to know they're not alone. Hopefully their own circumstances don't go as off the rails as hers did, but some probably do. After all, the majority of violence happens in economically depressed areas.

Anyway, it was good fun, not for the faint of heart, and Sadie was a compelling protagonist who would do anything for her sister, even when her sister is no longer here.

This review is a part of Kid Konnection, hosted by Booking Mama, a collection of children's book-related posts over the weekend.

This book is published by Wednesday Books, a division of Macmillan, my employer.

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