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Saturday, February 15, 2020

Book Review: A High Five for Glenn Burke by Phil Bildner

Silas Walker does a presentation about former Major League Baseball player Glenn Burke for his sixth grade class, complete (thanks to assistance from his best friend), sound effects and extra drama. Glenn Burke invented the high five in 1977. That blew my mind. (And it's really true!) The high five was invented after I was born. seems like it would have been centuries older, right? And it's wild that it was at a baseball game, so it's documented to the exact time and place.

What Silas doesn't tell his class or his baseball teammates is he has another reason he was researching Glenn Burke and is a huge fan--Glenn Burke was openly gay to his teammates. No, not to the general public, and yes, a coach asked him if he would get married just for show (he declined rather vociferously) and he was pretty quickly fired from baseball, despite being an excellent all-around player, which is rare.

You see, Silas is pretty sure he's gay. He's scared about it. He's scared to tell anyone, even his best friend, even his coach. But he sees how Glenn Burke dealt with it, in the 1970s. How he stood up for who he is. How he was discriminated against and run out of baseball. He sees a role model--and also a cautionary tale.

So Silas worries. He goes to school and he goes to baseball, and he's his usual fun-loving, exuberant, over-the-top self, but at the same time he's also always scared in the background. How will he be able to come to terms with this? His fear is making him lose part of who he is. Can he be strong like Glenn? Can he be himself, and be happy?

This review is a part of Kid Konnection, hosted by Booking Mama, a collection of children's book-related posts over the weekend.

This book is published by Farrar Straus and Giroux BYR, a division of Macmillan, my employer.

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