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Sunday, July 8, 2018

Book Review: Born to Run by Bruce Springsteen (audio)

What a glorious book! Made all the better by hearing Bruce himself read it on audio.

He had a close, loving, but unstructured childhood, where he often stayed up until all hours and didn't go to school, even as a quite young kid. His family was poor but because his father was a fix-it man, they were the first on their block to have a TV. He never felt truly deprived. His grandmother raised him more than his mother. And then at one point, he decided he really wanted a guitar. His mother bought him one that cost way more than they could afford, but also was a bad guitar, and yet he was determined to make it work. Eventually someone clued him in that he was playing a base as a guitar, and that's why it never was quite right.

One of his first bands had trouble finding a lead singer. They decided everyone in the band should try to sing, and Bruce was rejected instantly for his terrible voice. In fact they made fun of him for years for his bad voice. Like most bands, initially they were a cover band. But then Bruce wrote a song. And another song. It's actually not too surprising that he's a decent writer in this memoir, considering that he's been writing since he was about 16. Occasionally, there was a line where, to my amusement, I could hear the cringe in his voice. He's obviously thought it was really clever when he wrote it, I imagine it's a line that his editor flagged as being twee or eye-rolling or pretentious but he stuck to his guns. And now that he had to say it out loud, I could hear the embarrassment and regret in his voice. (Hint for aspiring writers: read everything you write out loud. You will find tons to fix with that method and catch loads of typos.) I feel smug on his editor's behalf.

Anyway, you hear about what it's like to tour, about his father's tricky mental health, about his first short marriage, about finally getting fame and recognition 20 years after he started playing, about his second happy marriage, about his long-time friendships with bandmates like Clarence Clemmons, about touring some more, about his kids, about being inducted into the Rock n Roll Hall of Fame, and finally about some of his own mental health issues (which, unlike his father, he gets help for. He both sees a therapist and is on medications.) He really wants to be open about those issues as he wants to destigmatize it so more people, like his father, will get help.

The book was fascinating, fun, well-written, occasionally poetic, and really made me understand what it's like to be a working musician, where this is a job, not a hobby or a lark or a treat. It's a job. And he's the CEO. And he has employees who count on him for their livelihoods. It is a different side of the industry than most people see. And he's had a truly fascinating life. I do wish there had been photos though. That feels like a big loss. I was so excited that I had both the print and audiobooks because I thought, for once I won't be stiffed on the photo insert! But alas, no photos.

My husband bought me the hardcover as a gift at an airport store, and I listened to the audiobook from my local library via Overdrive.

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