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Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Book Review: Nothing Good Can Come from This: Essays by Kristi Coulter

This is a memoir told in essays, which can feel disjointed, but for me it did come together in the end. Kristi is a successful businesswoman with a drinking problem. This is not a story commonly told. Pretty much all of the addiction memoirs I've run across have felt like a competition to who can achieve a new low. Which is a dreadful thing to aspire to, as many people die on their way down. Also, the vast majority of people with drinking problems do not have the horrific consequences described in those books. A lot of people are able to deny their problems, and also aren't able to find help they feel is appropriate because it's all geared to much more severe versions of the problem. But I really admire Kristi for acknowledging that it was a problem and figuring it all out for her, before she had terrible consequences. I think more people might see themselves in Kristi than in Sarah Hepola.

Anyway, I thought she was very forthright and straightforward. Her life seems fairly normal, with a loving husband she sometimes squabbles with, a house that sometimes breaks down, a very demanding job with a lot of travel, and a level of income that means she can eat out at super-fancy restaurants regularly, and developing a palate and considering herself a "foodie" came with an awful lot of wine. Soon she was drinking a bottle of wine every night. And when she tried not to, she found she couldn't. She'd really, really try, and she still couldn't.

What seemed to be key for her eventual success, after being a functional alcoholic for ten years, was when she stopped hoping that one day she's want to quit. And instead she just quit. It was waiting for the wanting, certain one day it would appear and provide her with unlimited fortitude and strength, that held her back.

It wasn't easy. And she didn't do it alone. Well, she did for the first year, white-knuckling it. But then she went to AA. She writes in a fun, breezy style, that's also refreshing for an addiction memoir. I really enjoyed it. It's short and can be read in just a few hours.

I got this book for free from my employer. It is published by FSG, a division of Macmillan.

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