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Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Book Review: Heart: A History by Sandeep Jauhar

It's odd that I am squeamish and yet like medical books. I nearly failed high school biology (and to be honest, I should have failed it. I only passed by cheating. Sorry, Mom.) and yet decades later, I wonder about those organs I tried not to look at too closely in my little frog.

I read Dr. Jauhar's first medical memoir, Interned, years ago. (Unfortunately, I missed his second memoir. This is his third.) Like in Atul Gawande's Being Mortal, in this one, Dr. Jauhar is not just the medical expert, but he also becomes a patient in his own arena. He is a cardiologist, and he got his brother (also a cardiologist) to run some tests and found his cardiac arteries were mostly blocked, while he was still on the young side of middle age. His grandfather died of a sudden heart attack, and many members of his family have heart problems.

But it is not just a memoir. It is about how the heart itself functions, including the ludicrous idea still circulating today that it's where "love" is (the first heart transplant patient's wife asked the doctors if he would still love her after the surgery.) It is about the history of the understand of the heart, and the history of cardiology. Even years after we were exploring the brain, the heart was still considered off limits to doctors. And as Dr. Jauhar remembers his training in cardiology and how he learned important facets of his field, he elucidates this vital organ in all its mystery and simplicity.

If you have any interest in the medical field at all, even tangential like mine, this is an excellent book.

This book is published by Farrar Straus and Giroux, a division of Macmillan, my employer.

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